Wednesday, April 16, 2014

5000 poppies in Federation Square

Recently I came across the blog 5000 poppies. Lynn Berry and Margaret Knight have a vision to plant 5000 poppies in Federation square in Melbourne as part of the 2015 Anzac Commemorations

The 5000 Poppies project will be “planting” a field of more than 5000 poppies in Fed Square Melbourne as a stunning visual tribute to Australian servicemen and women for more than a century of service in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations.

People are asked to make poppies (instructions can be found on the site) to be part of this display. Already they have more than 10 000 poppies.

I have decided to contribute to this project. My idea is to make a poppy for each of my extended family who fought in World War 1. As I started to make my list of soldiers I became disappointed with myself as I have neglected to tag these men with a military flag in Reunion. I am now trying to amend this.

These are the soldiers for whom I will dedicate my poppies.


  • Ernest Lee Dawson
  • Bertram Dawson
  • William Vesey Dawson
  • Gustav Lee Dawson
  • Clarence Seabrook
  • Cyril Noel Seabrook  *
  • Eric Charles Seabrook  *
  • Lawrence Seabrook
  • Reginald Henry Seabrook
  • Roy Hopetoun Seabrook
  • Thomas Claudius Seabrook
  • Walter Waldo Seabrook
  • Aubrey Adam Agnew
  • Adam Thomas Agnew
  • James Agnew
  • John Francis Xavier Moylan  *
  • Samuel McColm
  • William Moore  
  • John Moore  *
  • John Thomas Wright
  • Frederick Knox Wright
  • William Cecil Sibley  *

*  These men lost their lives during the war.



52 Weeks of Genealogical Records in 2014 – Week 11 Newspapers

This week is week 11 of  Shauna Hicks challenge for 2014.  Shauna said that this blog challenge is to stimulate my own genealogy blogging efforts in 2014 by focusing on a different kind of genealogical record each week. I wanted a challenge that reflected my own archival background as well as my own genealogy interests and there are probably lots of other records that I could have included. The challenge has an Australian focus but most of these records will be found just about anywhere in the genealogy world.

In the past I have made many trips to Canberra, Brisbane and Armidale to search microfilms of newspapers. I have searched through original newspapers at the Tenterfield library. I have even transported these bound papers in the boot of my car to Armidale so they could be microfilmed after I informed the university of their existence. 

However, these excursions are now more infrequent due to the advent of Trove in Australia. Genealogical research has certainly been simplified. No longer does one have to painstakingly trawl through newspapers searching for an article about a specific event. However, the main benefit I feel is finding other stories about events that we may never have know about.

I knew my great grandfather, Knox Moo had lost a finger in an accident. My father had told me the story about how while explaining to someone how he did it, he accidentally cut off another finger. Trove allowed me to verify this story. There is no way I could have ever discovered this without Trove. You can read the story here.

Many years ago, I was searching for information about my Seabrook family. Three members of the family died in Victoria in 1914. I knew that one, William Thomas had drowned attempting to rescue someone in the surf. I didn't want to spend the money purchasing a death certificate but I knew there would have been a story in the paper. I decided to start searching The Argus from 1st January onwards. I was ready for the long haul. However, imagine my excitement when I discovered the story on 4th January. You can read the post I wrote earlier this year to mark the centenary of this event. I was also fortunate that the next two deaths were in February and May.

I wait however, for the day that more country newspapers become a part of Trove. In the meantime, I feel fortunate to occasionally find interesting snippets from small country towns in the Brisbane papers. 









52 Weeks of Genealogical Records in 2014 – Week 10 Occupation Records

This week is week 10 of  Shauna Hicks challenge for 2014.  Shauna said that this blog challenge is to stimulate my own genealogy blogging efforts in 2014 by focusing on a different kind of genealogical record each week. I wanted a challenge that reflected my own archival background as well as my own genealogy interests and there are probably lots of other records that I could have included. The challenge has an Australian focus but most of these records will be found just about anywhere in the genealogy world.

It seems that each week (or when I get organised) I start to think about what to write for my post, I come up with something that I've already blogged about. This week is no exception. I thought I could share some of the certificates I have from when my great great grandfather William Lee Dawson studied medicine in Ireland and England in the 1840s and 1850s. This was my post for the 2012 Australia Day blogging challenge - Wealth for Toil by Shelly from Twigs of Yore

Instead I'll share occupation information about George Edward Lowe, spectacle maker of London and publican in Melbourne.

On 22nd November 1849, George Edward Lowe, spectacle maker of London was admitted to the Freedom of London. To become a freeman, men had to either complete an apprenticeship with a free man of the company and could now work at his trade in his own right, be a child of a freeman of the company, or buy the freedom of a company, Once you were a freeman of the company or guild you could apply for the freedom of the City. 
(Fitzhugh, T & Lumas S. (1991) The dictionary of genealogy. A & C Black : London.)




I have discovered no evidence of George Edward Lowe working as a spectacle maker in either Hobart or Melbourne where he lived. However, a search of Trove and Wise's Post Office Directory 1884-1885 revealed that George was the proprietor of Tankard's Family Temperance Hotel. 

The Public Notice below was published on 4th April 1883 in The Argus. It gives details of the transfer of the lease of Tankard's Temperance Hotel from John Tankard to George Ed. Lowe. 


The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) 4th April 1883, p. 3
 

Occupation records through advertisements can also be found in Wise's Post Office Directories.


Wise's Post Office Directory 1884-1885.